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Facts About Croaker – Welcome to Vinaquality Corporation

Facts About Croaker

A saltwater fish, the croaker is the smallest member of the Sciaenidae family of drums. The species gets its name from the croaking sound it makes from the voluntary contraction of muscles attached to the air bladder, which acts like a resonance chamber. It’s unclear whether the croaking is a form of communication within a school of fish, a means of depth sounding or a mating expression, but croakers tend to make the sound most often during breeding season.

Croaker is typically no longer than 1 ½ feet and less than 2 lbs. in weight. This bottom feeder can be found in coastal waters in spring, making it a popular catch for anglers of all skill levels. Raw croaker meat is usually snow white but may have a reddish tint. The cooked meat is white.Croaker is lean and full flavored, with an almost sweet taste. The flesh is firm, similar to that of black drum. The skin is edible. You can prepare croaker in a number of ways.

Scientific Name: Micropogonius undulatus

Market Name: Croaker

Common Name: Croaker, Atlantic croaker, hardhead

French Name: Tambour

German Name: Atlantischer Adlerfisch

Italian Name:

Japanese Name: Nibe

Spanish Name: Corbina Nutrition Facts

  • Calories: 104
  • Fat Calories: 29
  • Total Fat: 3.2 g
  • Saturated Fat: 1.1 g
  • Cholesterol: 61 mg
  • Sodium: 56 mg
  • Protein: 17.8 g
  • Omega 3: 0.3 g

Cooking Tips:

A popular pan fish, croaker is often breaded or dusted with cornmeal or flour and pan-fried. It can also be marinated and grilled or sautéed, roasted and broiled. For a Southern favorite, dip a dressed, scaled croaker in water, milk, egg or a combination of the three, then roll in corn flour and cook in hot grease. The meaty fish also can be steamed whole.

Cooking Methods:

  • Bake
  • Boil
  • Broil
  • Fry
  • Grill
  • Pate
  • Poach
  • Saute
  • Steam

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